Speech Technology Magazine

 

Jobaline Voice Analyzer Matches Service Workers to Jobs

Solution uses algorithms that predict human emotions elicited by paralinguistic elements of voice records.
Posted Oct 31, 2014
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Jobaline, a mobile and bilingual job marketplace that matches employers with hourly workers, has released Jobaline Voice Analyzer. The solution matches workers to jobs based on how listeners react emotionally to specific voices.

Jobaline automates the prescreening and matching of job applicants to hourly wage jobs, a segment that represents approximately two thirds of the U.S. labor force and where 50 million people are hired every year. As a result of processing more than 650,000 bilingual job applications that include automated phone interviews, Jobaline processed millions of voice responses from hourly wage job candidates of different cultures, education levels, genders, and ages.

Jobaline decided to enhance its job matching process by applying data sciences and advanced modeling to create algorithms that predict human emotions elicited by paralinguistic elements of those voice records. Paralinguistic elements, such as tone of voice, complement verbal communication and could add meaning. That means how things are said is as important as what is being said.

With the Voice Analyzer, Jobaline automates the recruiting process even further by identifying, in real time, workers with voices that the average individual will find engaging and pleasant. A practical application of this technology is in the services industry, where it is important for companies to hire front-line employees who can connect with their customers. 

"People intuitively know when a voice invites us to engage in a conversation, or when a voice sounds calming. This is the subjective analysis done millions of times every year by recruiters when hiring hourly workers," said Jobaline CEO Luis Salazar, in a statement. "Our technology draws an objective analysis of whether, based on some unique characteristics of the person's voice, an individual will perform better in specific roles, such as sales or customer service. We believe this is a natural step forward in the job matching economy."

More than 72 percent of U.S. consumers exposed to voice clips from job applicants agreed that the candidates selected by Jobaline's matching platform were engaging, appealing, and interesting. The study, performed by independent market research firms Core Solutions and Clear Voice Research, surveyed a representative U.S. sample by geographic region, income, ethnicity, gender, and age.

"Recorded answers are a fantastic tool for me and our hiring managers," said Abbey Mattson, director of human resources at the Crowne Plaza Kansas City Hotel, in a statement. "Being able to hear how our candidates answer our questions really gives us a good sense of who they are and what they may be best suited for before we decide to bring them in."


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