Speech Technology Magazine

 

June 06, 2018


Feature

Self-Service and Assisted Service: Putting It All Together

The customer experience gets a boost when service systems work as one

Industry Voices

Videos: What's Your Favorite Use of Speech Technology?

We caught up with industry-insiders Michael McTear, Allyson Boudousquie, Debra Cancro, and Crispin Reedy at SpeechTEK 2018 and asked them what their favorite use of speech technology was this year. Find out what they said in the video that follows.

Speech Technology Digest

Xerox Adds New Voice Command Solution to MFP

In an effort to build the most productive, efficient workplace, Xerox will feature Gabi Voice, a voice command solution for its Xerox AltaLink multifunction printers (MFPs).

Study Shows Americans Are Skeptical of Voice-Assisted Shopping

RichRelevance, a provider of experience personalization, released the results of its second annual survey on how U.S. consumers search for and find products online. And, while shoppers are interested in innovations such as personalized and image search, voice-assisted shopping is still far from mainstream.

Alexa Mishap Has Device Owners, Businesses Worried

You've probably already heard that Alexa recorded a family's entire conversation and then emailed it to someone on their contact's list. This is freaking out some customers who, apparently, didn't understand how Alexa works.

44% of Americans Would Rather Scrub a Toilet Than Call Customer Support

New data released from Helpshift looked at what Americans most dread about the customer support experience, how it could be improved, and which industries have the most room for improvement (spoiler alert: it's telecoms). The survey also asked Americans which AI technologies they like and which they find creepy or annoying.

Speech Technology News Features

Engaging Younger Audiences with Voice: New Opportunities to Connect with a Younger Demographic

Younger consumers—those 18 to 24 years old—are helping to drive adoption of voice technology, yet a study by PwC shows their use of it remains low. What does this mean for companies in the speech sector, and where can inroads be made?

 
[Newsletters] [Home]